While obtaining the marriage record for Adalbertus Rochowiak and Marianna Chlebowska, I had also asked Lukasz for the marriage record for their son, Martin, and Catherine Switała from November, 1877. The image isn’t near as clear as the one for Adalbertus and Marianna, and it’s a much larger image. So here are snippets showing just the record for Martin and Catherine. The top is the left side of the book, the bottom image is the right side of the book. I have to apologize for the size of the snippets. The original image was large and lower resolution, and it needed to be cropped and reduced quite a bit to fit on the screen here. You can click the snippets to enlarge. If you want a full copy, feel free to ask. I’m happy to send it on and can email it.

Left side: marriage record November 1877 for Martinus Rochowiak and Catherine Switała

Left side: marriage record November 1877 for Martinus Rochowiak and Catherine Switała

Right side: marriage record November 1877 for Martinus Rochowiak and Catherine Switała

Right side: marriage record November 1877 for Martinus Rochowiak and Catherine Switała

At the time of the marriage, Martin was 28 and Catherine 20. I cannot ascertain the exact date of the marriage; however, marriage banns were published on 20 October, 28 October, and 4 November. That should tell us that the marriage likely took place within the following week of the final publishing of banns. Catherine’s parents were Mathias and Marianna Zablocka. The couple was married in Góra Żnin.

Per the 1900 census, Martin and Catherine emigrated to the US in 1889. The children per that census were:

  1. Frances, b. 1880 (Poland)
  2. Agnes, b. 1882 (Poland)
  3. Teresa, b. 1883 (Poland)
  4. Joseph, b. 1890 (Toledo, Ohio)
  5. Jadwiga (Hattie), b. 1895 (Toledo, Ohio)
  6. Martha, b. 1899 (Toledo, Ohio)

I can’t say why, but I’m happy that I’m learning Frances had siblings and nieces and nephews in Toledo. This also makes me wonder if entire villages in Poznan emigrated to Toledo! (I am only half joking–the Plenzler family seemed to have emptied a few small villages themselves so far.) This also makes me wonder too if my great-great grandchildren would be able to find my family for their genealogy efforts. My family is now so very spread out over the United States–how difficult will that be in 90 or 100 years for my progeny to locate our whereabouts? Connecting the dots with my great-grandparents’ family who lived within a small radius together both in Poland and in Toledo continues to challenge me.

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