Rochowiak


It’s amazing tidbits of information I’ll squirrel away to follow up later and then to discover later they lead to more inquiry. It’s appropriate that one of the themes today over at GeneaBloggers is Mystery Monday. My posts yesterday about baptisms and Rochowiaks in Toledo made me remember a bit of information I squirreled away thinking that it would be relevant later.

When looking at the Rochowiak data I’ve found but haven’t been able to knit together, I put away a baptismal record for an Antoni Rochowiak last year because it was noted that my great-grandmother, Frances, was his sponsor or godmother. The date of this baptismal record was 2 May 1886 and is transcribed below:

Nomen: Antoni
Parentes: Laurentius Rochowiak, Rosalia Skolmowska
Parentini: Franciscus Skolmowski, Franscisca Przybylska
Nativ: 30 Aprilis
Bapt.: 2 Mai
Nomen Sacrodotis: Rev. M. F. Orzechowski

Then while reviewing the photos I had for Calvary, I noticed I had photographed the grave of  Antoni Rochowiak.

Antoni Rochowiak grave, Calvary Cemetery

Antoni Rochowiak grave, Calvary Cemetery

Antoni’s father is listed as Laurentius on the baptismal record–this is the Latin version of Lawerence, and Antoni is 33 on the 1920 census. Unfortunately, the priest didn’t record data beyond the parent’s names, so I couldn’t link Lawrence and Frances as siblings. (We do know Frances’ parents’ names — Adalbertus and Marianna Mazana .) Frances’ father, Adalbertus, was married twice. Per the church marriage record, he was noted as “viduus” or widower. Marianna Mazana was his second wife. It is very possible that Lawrence and Frances are siblings or half-siblings. Digging will continue.

09.18.2011: Please see the comments for this post. Information contained here is inaccurate. Judy Ellis provided information that she shared concerning Lawrence Rochowiak.

One of my great-grandmothers was Frances Rochowiak Przybylski. The Rochowiaks seem to have arrived early to the US. While research the name, I located a Lawrence Rochowiak. Per the 1920 census, Lawrence and his wife, Anna, arrived in the US in 1872 and each has a naturalization date of 1880. Per this census, Lawrence and Anna were living 1434 Nebraska with four children:

  • Anthony, age 33
  • Anna, age 27
  • Clara, age 21
  • Joe, age 17

Using Anthony’s age of 33 and Anna’s age of 53, it seems as if Anna and Lawrence immigrated just after marriage. I would suspect too that Lawrence was previously married and widowed while still in Poznan given that there is a 20 year age gap between him and Anna. A quick query to the Poznan database didn’t lead me to any quick clues; and it’s more than possible that Lawerence’s name had been changed upon immigration to the US, although I queried under the usual suspects of Polish and Latin names such as Lorenz, Laurentius, and Wawrzyn.  It’s likely that his birthdate year of 1845 is just a guesstimate and it’s also possible that the name was recorded under a different form. I’ve seen Rochowiak referred to as Grochowiak and Prochowiak on the database. So more research is needed to determine if and how Lawrence and Anna are connected to Frances Rochowiak.

I do have a grave photo for Anna and Lawerence.

Anna and Lawerence Rochowiak grave Calvary Cemetery

Anna and Lawerence Rochowiak grave Calvary Cemetery

I do have Lawrences’s date of death–June 4, 1930. I haven’t located his death certificate but have found an index of Ohio deaths dated June 1930 that lists Lawrence. Additionally, there is a death notice for Lawrence published in the Toledo News-Bee dated June 5, 1930. The death notice is transcribed below:

ROCHOWIAK, LAWRENCE–Beloved husband of Anna, Wednesday, June 4, at 10:30 a.m. Age 84 years. Funeral Saturday, June 7 from his residence, 1434 Nebraska Ave., at 8:30 and St. Anthony’s church at 9 a.m. Burial Calvary. Czolgosz mortuary.

The Calvary Cemetery burial register provides the record for Lawerence’s burial as well as the location of the grave. (I do not have any death or burial information yet for Anna.) The burial record is transcribed below:

No.: 31413
Name: Lawrence Rochowiak
Residence: 1434 Nebraska
Age: 84
Cause of Death: Accidental fall
Date of Interment: June 7
Grave: S 1/2 of E 1/2
Range or Lot: 32
Section: 19
Undertaker: J. G. Czolgosz
Remarks:

I have no links to this Lawrence Rochowiak to my great-grandmother. It would be interesting to learn if Frances was related to this Rochowiak family–it seems as if many from the region of Chomętowo, Poznan, Poland were related and many had contacts in or had lived in Toledo or northwest Ohio. If you have any information, please leave a message here or send me an email and I’ll follow up.

I’ve been pondering the marriage record for Adalbertus Rochowiak and Marianna Mazana. Adalbertus and Marianna were the parents of Frances Rochowiak, my great-grandmother. We know that Adalbertus was a widower, age 50 and marrying Marianna who was 27 at the time and they had married in Góra Żnin in 1851. I have also found that Adalbertus’ previous marriage was likely to a Marianna Chlebowska. This marriage occurred in Chometowo in 1832. In the near future, I will obtain that record (I usually like to request several at once via the Poznan Project and am keeping a list). What had me stumped, besides the poor quality of the record image and likely bad eyesight, was the fact that both Adalbertus and Marianna seemed to have the same mother: Marianna Brzykca. A bit of inquiry to the Polish Genius discussion group helped to clear that up. It seems as if the Brzykca name (the feminine adjectival form, the male form is Brzycki) was a relatively common name in a rather small geographic region. A few members of the discussion group provided some very helpful and relevant background information. However, only 66 people in Poland currently use the name now, and they are concentrated in a small area. My great-great grandparents were from Gora Znin, and were married there, and it seems this town as a hotspot for Brzykas. See this map of name distributions: http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/brzykca.html — this is the concentration for the feminine form of the name, Brzycka. and compare to this distribution: http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/brzykcy.html — this is the concentration for the male form of the name, Brzycki. According to one of my respondents, Bruckner’s etymological dictionary lists the forms of the name Brzyka and Brzyca as alternative names for Millet. (I do not have access to this dictionary nor could I find this listed in my Polish dictionary or in an online lexicon.) Another mentioned that “bryck” is a root word meaning to “frisk, gambol” from Latin. I have no historical distribution data of the name from the mid 1800s when Adalbertus and Marianna were married. But it is reasonable to believe that it was an unusual coincidence that the groom’s mother and bride’s mother had the same last name. This marriage record also provides a bit of insight about Adalbertus and Marianna. Adalbertus is mentioned to be a “mercenarius” or worker for hire. Marianna is mentioned as a “famula” or servant. Having this record reviewed by others was immensely helpful. In addition to providing insight on the Brzycka/Brzycky name, we’ve learned that the Brzycka/Brzycky name is mentioned again on the marriage following Adalbertus’ and Marianna’s. The following record lists a Melchior Bauza marrying a Hedwig Konczal. (There are some Konczals in my family tree, a Przybylski marriage to a Konczal.) The bride’s mother is named as Victoria Brzycka and the marriage was witnessed by an Augustinius Brzycky. How interesting is that? There may be more connections to make from this one record!

When I began to first research my great-grandparents, Andrew Przybylski and Frances Rochowiak, things just didn’t seem to stack up right. There are a number of Przybylskis in the Toledo area, and it seemed several of them married into the Plenzler family. However, I could not put my finger on all of the children Andrew and Frances had. Originally, I had located these offspring. Then while searching through baptismal records, I had located Marianna Przybylski. Correspondence between myself and John Plenzler indicated that Andrew and Frances had two other sons: John and Joseph.

However, John and Joseph remained rather elusive. Joseph though was hiding right beneath  my nose and I didn’t realize it until reading my grandfather’s (John Plenzler) baptismal record. Sometimes a little insomnia is all it takes–not being able to sleep, I was reviewing data on my mother’s family. And voila. There Joseph appeared, bright as daylight. He was baptized the same day, by the same priest as my grandfather John Plenzler was baptized.

Joseph was born February 18, 1885 and baptized February 22. See record #20 here.  The record is transcribed below:

Record #20
Nomen Infantis: Joseph
Parentes: Andreas Przybyla, Francisca Rochowiak
Patrini: Majher Nowicki, Michaelina Osinska
Nati: 18 Februarii
Bapt: 22 Februarii
Nomran Sacrdotis: Rev. M. F. Orzechowski

Note that the family’s last name here is listed as Przybyla, not Przybylski.

Joseph married a woman named Rose and they resided at 507 Pulaski Street per the 1920 census. The 1930 census places the Joseph Przybylski family at 1625 Belmont Avenue.

Per the 1930 census, Joseph and Rose had four children:

  • Virginia
  • Richard
  • Alvine (Alvina?)
  • Dorothy

Joseph passed away on July 8, 1937.  He was 51 per his Ohio Death certificate. His obituary was published in the Toledo News-Bee on July 9 and is transcribed below:

Joseph Przybylski

Joseph Przybylski died Thursday in his home at 1517 Pinewood Ave.

He leaves his wife, Rose; three daughters, Mrs. Virginia Napierala and Misses Eleanor and Dorothy, a son, Richard; four sisters, Mrs. Mary Erdman, Mrs. Dorothy Sieja, Mrs. Netti Plenzler, and Mrs. Eva Hejnicki; a brother, Frank, all of Toledo, and another brother, John, Detroit.

Services will be held at 8:30 a.m. Monday in the residence at and 9 a.m. in St. Stanislaus Church. Burial will be in Calvary.

This obituary proves the existence of another sibling named John. The existence of yet another sibling, named Dorothy will need to be investigated. His daughter, Dorothy, could not have been married at his death. She was only two years old at the time of the 1930 census. However, Joseph did have a sibling named Victoria who had married Frank Sieja. So it is possible the name is simply misprinted in the obituary.

Joseph was buried from St. Stanislaus parish in Calvary Cemetery on July 12, 1937. The church death record is transcribed below:

Record of Interments
Date of Death and Burial: D. July 8th, B. July 12th
Name of Person Interred: Przybylski, Joseph
Place of Birth: Poland
Age: 51y
Disease: Heart
Priest: John A. Labuzenski (sp?)
Cemetery: Calvary

Note that the place of birth is incorrect as there is a record of his birth in Toledo, Ohio through St. Anthony’s Parish that reflects both his date of birth and date of baptism.

Joseph’s burial record from Calvary Cemetery is transcribed below:

No.: 38869
Name: Joseph Przybylski
Residence: 1517 Palmwood
Age: 51
Cause of Death: Unknown
Date of Interment: July 13
Grave: 100
Range or Lot: 10
Section: 40
Undertaker: F. Czglosz
Remarks:

Research to continue to locate John and verify the possibility of yet another Przybylski sibling named Dorothy.

I cannot transcribe this record well. It is a photo of the original record from the Catholic parish in Góra Żnin. What I can read from the record and can verify through the Poznan project website is this:

Date of marriage: October 27, 1851

Groom: Aldabertus Rochowiak, age 50. (I mistranscribed the original age!)
Parents of the groom: Alexander Rochowiak and Marianna Brzycka.
Within the data for the groom, I noticed that the description of viduus, indicating that Adalbertus was widowed and it also seems to indicate that he was from Chomętowo, which where Frances and Andrew were married.

Bride: Marianna Mazana, age 27
Parents of the bride: Lucas Mazany and Marianna Brzycka

So, how does this add up? I don’t know. It’s surprising to me to see the mothers names were the same! Is Brzycka a common name in the Poznan region?

Also, I found another marriage record for Adalbertus Rochowiak dated 1831. The first marriage was Marianna Chlebowska. Because of the time that Frances was born (1859), I am going to assume that she was a child of Adalbertus’ second marriage.

Unfortunately, I am finding it very difficult to find any relatives for Frances! If there are any Toledo Rochowiaks out there and can trace Frances Rochowiak Przybylski to your tree, I would love to hear from you!

I know I’ve been away too long! My email box is littered and I’ve been traveling again for work.

During the holidays, I had received yet another marriage record, this time for my Rochowiak great-great grandparents! I so far haven’t gathered too much data on the Rochowiaks; however, I did find a marriage record for Frances’ parents on the Poznan project (http://bindweed.man.poznan.pl/posen/search.php) and Lukasz was kind enough to send it to me over the Christmas holidays.

Here is a PDF scan of the record sent to me.

I have not transcribed this record yet but it does verify the names of my great-great grandparents: Aldabertus Rochowiak and Marianna Marazana. The date of marriage was October 27, 1851. That places the birthdate of Aldabertus at about 1821 and the birthdate for Marianna at about 1824. Hopefully, this information will eventually provide hints on other Rochowiaks and it also introduces me into one more surname in my family history: Marzana. My next goal: transcribe this record for new clues and hints!

This weekend, I was excited because I finally received the marriage records from Poznan, Poland for my great-grandparents and great-great grandparent: Eva Dauer and John Plenzler, and Andreas Dauer and Maria Aumiller (Eva’s parents), and for Joseph Plenzler and Mary Leiseick (John’s parents). I also received another Plenzler marriage record, one for Margaretha Plenzler and Michael Mruk (daughter of John Pleznler and Mary Leiseicka, my great-grandparents). These will be transcribed and I’ll get to posting more about Plenzlers in the near future.

I thought the Plenzlers were prolific–every time I seemed to have located one, another two popped up.

The Przybylskis are outdoing the Plenzlers. For sometime, I had reason to suspect that Frances and Andrew had more children than were documented here. John Plenzler had told me a few times that there were two other brothers: John and Joseph. However, I have not found records or any hints of these two until recently. Additionally, another sibling appears while I was looking for John and Joseph: Marianna.

I located Marianna while searching for any marriage records I could through St. Anthony’s Parish. I was actually looking to see if I could locate records for John or Joseph–typically, it seems as if the clan remained together and migrated together and stayed together so it made sense to see if they married in the neighborhood. Lo and behold. I didn’t find any marriage records for John or Joseph, but I did locate a marriage record for Marianna, who married Joseph Ertman.

I have not completely transcribe this record (it’s written in Latin and I’m very, very rusty with what little Latin I know); however, it’s clear to see that Marianna was the daughter of Andreas Przybylski and Francisca Rochowiak. Additionally, the marriage was witnessed and signed by Frank Przybylski.

A bit more research led me to locate the Ertman family on the 1910 census, where they were living at 1610 Vance Street. Many of the Przybylskis resided on Vance.

I did find some trace of John Przybylski. John Plenzler told me that he had changed his name and left the area to live in Miami, Florida to captain a fishing boat. The story goes he was running away from a gang. The names John Przybylski used were John Seblaski and Johnnie Bear. So, I managed to find two census records for John Seblaski: one in 1920 in Detroit, Michigan and another in a 1945 Florida census. The Florida census data does reflect that John Seblaski is a boat captain.

I also reviewed some of Andrew Przybylski’s data just to see if there were more clues about his children. I have little data on Andrew; however, there is a hint. Andrew was listed in the 1892-1893 Polk directory for Toledo. That same directory reflects a Joseph Przybylski, who resides on Blum Street. More research needed!

I also located data for John Przybylski. The 1900 census and the 1920 census both reflect him living at 1461 Vance Street with his wife, Teckla Mruk, and their family.

Now, a lot of this doesn’t quite add up, though. Per Frances’ and Andrew’s marriage record from Chometowo, and the marriage abstract from the Pozan Project website, Andrew and Frances were married in 1873. Marianna was born in 1875. It’s possible one other child was born prior to Marianna. However, John’s estimated birthdate is 1869. If Frances were born on the date as stated in her death certificate, September 8, 1859–she would have been only 10 years old. That’s not really quite possible, she would not have been of childbearing age. However, her marriage record of 1873 states that she is about 26, meaning she would have been born about 1847.

More mystery, more intrigue. Does this imply that perhaps Andrew was widowed and previously married? Does this imply a Polish shot gun wedding? Does this imply that perhaps Frances ran away to marry (that perhaps the age on the marriage record is inaccurate)? We may never know! And more research is needed on John, Joseph, and Marianna!

But for now, goodnight to all and to all a goodnight!

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