Since the last I posted, I did some more research on Andreas Dauer, my 2nd great-grandfather. I knew he was married three times: to Marianna Hirsch, Marianna Remlein, and Maria Aumiller. His third wife was my 2nd great-grandmother. Andreas had children with each wife, and the best I can determine his children with each wife are listed below:

Marianna Hirsch (b. about 1810, m. Andreas 14 January 1839 in Gluszyna, and d. 8 December 1840 in Czapury).

  1. Jan Dauer, b. 2 December 1839 in Czapury and died 29 December 1839 in Czapury.
  2. Barbara Dauer, b. 25 November 1840 in Czapury. Death and marriages unknown.

Marianna Remlein (b. about 1814 in Czapury, m. Andreas on 13 October 1841, d. in Czapury 19 December 1841).

  1. Margaretha, b. about 1842 in Czapury, m. Andreas Torz 1864 in Gluszyna, m. Valentine Olejniczak 1881 in Wiry, d. 15 December 1884 in Wiry.
  2. Katharina, b. 18 November 1843 in Czapury, m. Michael Kajser 25 October 1863, d. unknown. (So, this is the son-in-law who reported Andreas’ death!)
  3. Marianna, b. 30 July 1845 in Czapury, d. 17 May 1846 in Czapury.
  4. Peter, b. 15 February 1847 in Czapury, m. Auguste Franke in Glatz, Preußen 9 November 1875, d. unknown.
  5. Eva, b. 15 December 1848, m. and d. unknown. (This Eva is not my great-grandmother.)

Maria Aumiller, b. about 1826 in Czapury, m. Andreas 29 November 1856 in Gluszyna, d. 16 July 1866 in Wiorek.

  1. Martin, b. 9 November 1856 in Czapury, d. 20 November 1859 in Czapury.
  2. Eva b. 21 December 1857 ¹ in Czapury, m. Joseph Plenzler 8 November 1879 in Gluszyna, d. 20 October 1914 in Toledo, Ohio. (This Eva is my great-grandmother.)
  3. Andreas, b. 13 November 1859 in Czapury, d. 27 December 1859 in Wiorek.
  4. Michael, b. 3 September 1861 in Wiorek, m. Marie Wojciechowska in November 1866, d. unknown.
  5. Katharina, b. 12 October 1864, m. Casimir Borowicz February 1884, d. unknown, found residing in Erie, Pennsylvania in 1917.

Reviewing all the data I had located through the Gluszyna parish to establish Andreas’ death and marriages helped to identify all of his children. I was unaware of nearly all of his children with Marianna Remlein. I was able to locate a son, Peter, and find Katharina Dauer Kajser’s marriage to identify who reported Andreas’ death.

Again, the recurrent theme in my ancestry: repeated names. Much of my confusion when trying to identify members of Andreas’ family was the fact he had two Katharinas and two Evas. I do know there are mentions of another Eva Dauer in the Gluszyna parish records, but I had ignored them all of this time thinking this Eva was likely the daughter of another family. I now know I need to re-review those records.

Except for Eva Dauer Plenzler, a good number of Andreas’ children just “fall off the radar” for me and I cannot locate deaths, although I can locate marriages and some children in a number of instances. So I have some work ahead of me to try to trace the children I know were living when Andreas died. I know one other child besides Eva Dauer Plenzler came to the US, but not to Toledo. Katharina Dauer Borowicz was found with her husband Casimir in the 1920 census in Erie, Pennsylvania. I had also noted Casimir was listed in an Erie, Pennsylvania City Directory as early as 1913. So I believe Katharina and Casimir came to the US much later than her sister Eva Dauer Plenzler and her husband, Joseph. Eva would have died shortly after their arrival (20 October 1914), so it’s possible the sisters would not have been able to reunite and visit each other. I would like to think they had, but there likely is no record of such a visit.

¹ A small added bonus to all of this was locating my great-grandmother’s birth record by re-reviewing all of the records I was able to locate from the Gluszyna parish and being able to review her birth record. Eva Dauer Plenzler’s death certificate states her date of birth was 24 December 1857. But her birth record from the Gluszyna parish indicates she was born 23 December–so her death certificate was a day off on her birth date.

Advertisements

Been a long time, eh? Yes, I am still researching, but not much time to write or publish this blog. Part of what’s kept me busy on the research end has been the brickwall of my 2x great-grandparents, Maria Aumiller and Andreas Dauer.

Sometime ago, I had been contacted by the great-granddaughter of Adalbert Aumiller. We had exchanged a number of emails where she had provided me considerable detail about Adalbert, who was married in the same Catholic parish in Gluszyna as my great-grandmother and great-grandfather, Eva Dauer and Joseph Plenzler.  The Adalbert in question was a theoretical possibility being tossed about that he was somehow related to Eva Dauer, whose mother was Maria Aumiller.

Well, I haven’t proved that yet. We discussed a possibility that Adalbert and Eva were connected as first cousins–the theory was that Adalbert and Eva shared a grandfather named Bartholomeus and a grandmother named Barbara Schneider. Research on this angle has not yet proved fruitful, but I believe I need to pursue this line of thinking further.

Fortunately, persistence did pay off and I did manage to find a death record for Maria that provided her parents’ names. Maria died 16 July 1866 in Wiorek. See entry #45 in the image below.

Maria Aumiller Dauer death 16 July 1866

Maria Aumiller Dauer death 16 July 1866

Maria’s parents were Michael Aumiller and Maria Remlein. So it appears I may need to trace Michael to determine whether his parents were Bartholomeus and Maria Remlein. (Remlein is a repeated name within my lines, there is a small handful of marriages within my mother’s lines that involved Remleins. Which, to add confusion to this issue, the second wife of Andreas was a Marianna Remlein. I’m certain anyone who has researched small villages in Poland will feel the pain with the names and untangling the relationships!)

Maria died of cholera at the age 40. When she died, there was a cholera epidemic that spread through Poland due to the Austrian-Prussian war in 1866. This epidemic was part of a worldwide pandemic of cholera that occurred from approximately 1863 through 1875 and began in the Middle East and then was spread throughout Russia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas via travelers. It seems the region around the Gluszyna parish where this death record is from had been particularly hit hard in summer of 1866. Each death except for one this page was caused by cholera.

While searching for further information on Maria, I found a death record for Andreas as well within the death records for the parish in Gluszyna. Andreas died 17 April 1871 of “febris nervosa,” probably typhoid fever.

Andreas Dauer death 17 April 1871

Andreas Dauer death 17 April 1871

What is particularly interesting in Andreas’ death record is the fact his death was reported by a Michael Kajser, indicated as his son-in-law (zięć). Andreas is noted to have seven children, three of whom are of minor age. I have not yet determined which of his daughters married a Michael Kajser. (I do have twelve children overall for Andreas, however, I do not know all of which had died before 1871–another area for research. I can easily rule out daughter Eva, who was born in 1857 and died in Toledo, Ohio in 1914.)

Ah yes, I’ve been away again. I’ve been overwhelmed with genealogy goodness this summer. This time, more Plenzler researchers, actually a married couple, digging into the depths of Plenzler history have aided. Jim Sobieski, and his wife, Cinny have been researching their branch of the family and have happily shared their mother lode. So, I have a treasure chest of LDS scans to pour through, and for me, it’s slow going but valuable information.

Information I’ve received from Jim and Cinny include the birth record for my great-great grandmother, Marianna Lesiecka, wife of Joseph Plenzler. She was born 11 September 1825, and the birth/baptism was recorded in the parish in Wiorek. See snippet below. Click it to enlarge.

Marianna Leseicka birth record from parish in Wiorek, 11 September 1825

Marianna Leseicka birth record from parish in Wiorek, 11 September 1825

Looking at the record, we now know Marianna’s father was Adalbertus (Adalberti in Latin) and Barbara. However, I cannot read Barbara’s maiden name easily to transcribe. Also, Marianna’s godparents appear to be Ignatius Leseicka and Marianna Heigelmann. I’ve highlighted Barbara’s maiden name and part of the godparents’ name. Perhaps someone can take a stab with the transcriptions, I give up on Barbara’s maiden name and there seems to be a phrase I am unfamiliar with after Ignatius’ name, nor am I certain of the last name of the godmother.

The phrase behind Ignatius’ name appears to be “ovilis,” Latin for “sheepfold” (according to William Whitaker’s Latin translator). I am puzzled by this phrase, perhaps because I was hoping it would indicate the exact relationship of Ignatius to the family. However, this could be interpreted as he is only a member of the parish. I have never seen this phrase prior in a church record. It would be interesting to learn what this phrase indicates.

On the same page for the birth record of Marianna, I noticed an interesting entry. I believe Wiorek must have been a very small village. There is a birth record for a child named Andreas Hirsch, born 31 August 1825. What makes this record interesting are several things, and not all are apparent.

Andreas is the son of Joannes Hirsch and Marianna Aumiller.

Here is the snippet for Andreas Hirsch. Again, click to enlarge.

Andreas Hirsch birth/baptism record, Wiorek 31 August 1825

Andreas Hirsch birth/baptism record, Wiorek 31 August 1825

The first two items of interest are apparent — the name of Marianna Aumiller. Eva Dauer’s mother’s name was Maria Aumiller. I do not know if this is Eva’s mother; however, Eva married the son of Marianna Lesiecka and Joseph Plenzler. Also, in this record the name Plenzler is mentioned as a godparent to Andreas. I cannot transcribe the first name.

What is not apparent in this record, and I neglected to highlight it, is the name, Andreas Krych. It appears in this record, the child’s lineage is noted and Andreas Krych is his grandfather, the father of Marianna Aumiller.

Additionally, I have not mentioned this previously, but through Jim and Cinny’s research, I have come to believe that my great-grandfather, Joseph Plenzler had a brother named Bartholomeus. Bartholomeus married a Barbara Hirsch. in the future, I’ll post a bit on this Bartholomeus.

The Krych name is of interesting in that that my great-great grandfather, Joseph Plenzler (husband of Marianna Lesiecka), had a brother name John. John married a Mary Krych. John Plenzler and Mary Krych eventually settled in Middle River, Minnesota.

How does this all fit together? Every piece of the puzzle creates more mystery!

Today’s theme over at GeneaBloggers is Wedding Wednesday. Today’s photo is provided by John Plenzler, who graciously sent me a number of photos quite a while ago. It is a mystery photo. Per information that was provided with the photo:

Unknown wedding, may be descendants of Joseph and Eva Dauer. May be Sophie Plenzler and Steve Szymanowski, not sure need verification.  Bride resembles Barbara Szymanowski.  May also be Frank Plenzler and Sophie Szymanowski, Sophie was Steve’s sister. Click the photo to see a larger high-res scan.

Unknown wedding photo

Unknown wedding photo

I have no other clues. If any one can help identify these two, leave a comment here or drop me an email.

I love looking at old wedding photos. This bride has such a sweet face. Doesn’t the groom look ahem a bit as if he is wondering what he’d just gotten into? If you zoom in on the wedding dress, check out the detail. It appears as if there is an apron embroidered with hundreds of delicate stones–beautiful! If you zoom in on the bride’s stockings, they’re lovely and embroidered also.

After posting about the gravestone I’d found for a Maryanna Aumiller, I went through all of the photos I have from Calvary.  Sure enough, I found I’d taken one of Maryanna’s husband, Adelbert “George” Aumiller. I hope eventually to establish some connection with the Aumillers to the Plenzers and hopefully in the future locate any possible Dauer relatives through my great-grandmother, Eva Dauer Plenzler.

Here is the photo for Adelbert “George” Aumiller:

Adelbert "George" Aumiller grave Calvary Cemetery, Toledo, Ohio

Adelbert "George" Aumiller grave Calvary Cemetery, Toledo, Ohio

The grave location in Calvary is: Grave: 921, Range or lot: 6, Section: 3

Because one of the themes today over at GeneaBloggers is Tombstone Tuesday and I’ve mentioned a couple of times that my great-great grandmother was an Aumiller (Maria Aumiller), I thought I’d post a gravestone I located in Calvary.

Now I haven’t connected any dots with any Aumillers that I’ve located in Toledo to my family yet. But the proof that I’m related to Aumillers comes from baptismal records of two of Eva Dauer’s and Joseph Plenzler’s children–Bob and Mary. In their baptismal records from St. Anthony’s parish of Toledo, the grandparents are noted as well as as the parents.  In Bob’s baptismal record, it appears as if the name were recorded in German: Ömiller. But in Mary’s baptismal record, it is recorded as Aumiller.

I haven’t really pursued any Aumiller connections yet; but when I do photo Calvary, I will take photos of graves with names that sound familiar to me. So while going through the photos for today’s theme, I noticed I took a picture of a grave of someone named Maryanna Aumiller.

Maryanna Aumiller, 1856 - 1918, Calvary Cemetery grave

Maryanna Aumiller, 1856 - 1918, Calvary Cemetery grave

I had done some initial investigation with Maryanna, but nothing leads me to link her to Eva. However, I did locate a 1900 census record that reflects Maryanna, her husband George, and family living at 1555 Avondale in the Kuschwantz neighborhood. Joe and Eva Plenzler were living at 1544 Avondale. They most certainly knew each other–they were neighbors and many Catholic families on that street attended St. Anthony’s parish.

Maryanna and George had nine children per the 1900 census:

  • Anthony (age 18)
  • Agnes (age 16)
  • Kate (age 14)
  • Wiktorya (Victoria) (age 12)
  • Anna (age 11)
  • Joseph (age 11)
  • Stanislawa (age 9)
  • Ignace (age 7)
  • Konstancya (age 5)

I have also obtained Maryanna’s death certificate, church burial/death record through St. Anthony’s parish and burial record through Calvary. What is unusual about this is when comparing these records with the gravestone, it’s obvious that someone guesstimated her birth year. Her grave stone states she was born in 1856, which would have made Maryanna 62 years old at the time of death. However, her death certificate states her birthdate is unknown. Her burial record from Calvary Cemetery, is transcribed below, provides the grave location:

No.: 20200
Name of Deceased: Mary Aumiller
Place of Nativity:
Late Residence: 1217 Lucas
Age: 59
Color: W
Sex: F
Disease: Heart Disease
Date of Decease: Oct. 31
Date of Interment: Nov. 2
Married, Single, or Widowed: M
Place of Death: Toledo
No. of Grave:  425
No. of Lot: 4
No. of Section: 30
Name of Physician: Watts
Name of Undertaker: W. J. Sujkowski
Name of Parents or Kindred:
Remarks:

Maybe this will provide a start to making links with Aumillers. Maryanna would be linked to Eva through her husband. If anyone has any information on this family, leave a comment here or drop me an email. I’ll follow up.

Some time ago, I had received a hand-drawn family tree for the Plenzlers with a cover letter dated 1991 that mentioned a John Plenzler who had settled in Minnesota. This family tree and the letter were created by Theresa Plenzler Helminiak, a cousin.

While tracing my great-grandfather, Joseph Plenzler, I realized he had several siblings because of this information yet I hadn’t followed up with any of Joseph’s siblings here. A good prod came from Judy again, because truthfully, I was asleep at the wheel this summer with any genealogy efforts. Let’s just say it’s been a busy summer and I’m trying to make sure I find at least a few hours each week to get more research and writing done.

Per the information Theresa (Tessie) recorded, Joseph had at least five siblings that I could verify and locate:

  • Margaretha and then see here and here. Margaretha and Joseph were the only siblings who settled in Ohio.
  • John settled in Minnesota with his wife Marianna (Mary). He’s the subject of this post.
  • Catharine married Jacob Niemier and settled in South Bend, Indiana.
  • Elizabeth married Joseph Zalas and settled in South Bend, Indiana.
  • Kunegunda married Stephen Zalas and settled in South Bend, Indiana.

The sisters, Catharine, Elizabeth, and Kunegunda will be topics in the near future.

Per census records and a marriage record I located via the Poznan Project, Johannes (John) was born about 1857. The record I found on the Poznan Project indicated that Johannes and Marianna married in 1877 in Głuszyna–a common fact in my branch of the Plenzler family. She was 19, he was 20. Marianna’s maiden name was Krych. I will have to write to obtain the actual marriage record(s)–and see if there are both civil and church marriage records to review.

After this point, things get a little murky with John and Mary. While Tessie documented John and Mary as having lived in Minnesota, there are a few immigration records that do not make their arrival quite clear.

A Hamburg manifest heading into New York was located for John, indicates that he left Europe on 4 April 1883. A corresponding record at Castle Garden for his arrival also exists that provides his date of arrival to the US as 20 April 1883 and his occupation as a mason. However, this manifest indicates that his final destination is Wisconsin.

Digging into this further, I had to look at census sheets and to also look at Mary’s immigration records. A passenger manifest for the ship, Weser, arriving into Baltimore from Bremen documents her arrival on 20 April 1884. On this manifest is some interesting information. Marianna arrives with two daughters: Veronica, age 6 and Barbara, age 11 months. Immigrant mothers arriving with infants or small children isn’t unusual although it’s always noteworthy. However, viewing the passenger record just above Marianna’s name is a record for a Cecelia Aumiller. That notation nearly knocked my socks off. My great-great-grandmother was Maria Aumiller before her marriage to Andreas Dauer. Their child, Eva, married Joseph Plenzler. My guess is that Cecelia was either a sister to Andreas (her age is listed as 63) or she was a wife to a brother of Andreas! I have not yet definitively located any of my Aumiller relatives in the US although I have had clues. This is going to be an area of future research–I am so hoping to eventually find if there are Aumillers to whom I am related to in the US.

While researching John and Mary, I have located some indirect evidence that they had remained together in Wisconsin for a while prior to settling in Minnesota. Thanks to Judy, we have the 1900 Federal Census that shows John and Mary living in Middle River, Minnesota. Note that on this record, the surname is spelled as Plenzer. Here the census provides information on the family as it was in 1900:

  • John is listed as Charles. I do believe this to be an error on the part of the census taker. His birth is listed as March 1857, age 43.  However, his immigration is recorded as 1881. It is possible the John had come to the US earlier and had returned. Remember that Marianna had traveled to the US with a small child of 11 months in 1884, so that would have placed Barbara’s birth in 1883.
  • Mary’s birth is indicated as August 1859 and her age is 41. Note that she has had 10 children, but six are still alive in 1900.
  • Daughter Barbara is then noted, with her birthdate given of September 1883. (This is difficult to ascertain because it appears as if the census taker had made a mistake and tried to write over the original answer, however, Barbara’s age seems to be provided as 17.) This would make sense if she were not quite a year old upon immigration in 1884.
  • Son, Mike, is then listed. He, and two of his following siblings, are noted as having been born in Wisconsin. Mike is noted as 11 and born in September 1888.
  • Son, Frank, is then listed. His birthdate is provided as February 1890 and is noted as 10 years old.
  • Son, John, is then listed. His birthdate is provided as April 1893 and is noted as 7 years old.
  • Son, Nicholas, is then listed. His birthdate is provided as April 1896. The census taker noted his age as 3, but if he were born in 1896, his age should have been noted as 4 at the time of this census (June 1900).

The 1905 Minnesota state census reflects the same information for the family. Note on this record, the surname is spelled as Plencner or Plencener. (Begin with record #37.)

Realizing that Mary had traveled to the US in 1884 with two daughters, Barbara and Veronica, I noticed that neither the 1900 census or the 1905 state census reflected any information for Veronica and that the 1900 census stated she had six children living, it was apparent that Veronica had already left home. I located Veronica, noted as Verona, on an 1895 Minnesota state census where she was living in Argyle, Minnesota at the age of 17. If she were six at the time of arrival in the US, she would have been born about 1878, making her 17 at the time of this census. So this census data likely reflects that this is indeed John and Mary’s daughter, Veronica.

I have not been able to locate a 1910 US census with this family’s data; however, the 1920 and 1930 census data is available. This is data too indicates that it’s possible the John had come to the US in 1881 but did not stay.

The 1920 census shows us that Mary and John are still living in Middle River, Minnesota. Note that on this census, the surname is given as Plencner. Here, John’s immigration date is provided as 1881 and Mary’s as 1882.  Also note that John was naturalized in 1900, and Mary is also indicated as having been naturalized. (I believe that spouses whose husbands were naturalized at this time were automatically granted naturalization, but this would need some verification.) John and Mary are listed as no longer having an occupation; however, two sons reside with them: Mike and Frank who appear to be running the family farm.

The 1930 census is even more interesting. See page 1 here and page 2 here–data for the family spans two pages.

On page 1, John and Mary are listed as records 49 and 50. They are on the same farm that they own, ages 73 and 71, respectively. The same immigration dates of 1881 for John and 1882 for Mary are provided.

On page 2, son Frank, is still living on the same farm with John and Mary, single, age 38, and seems to be also running the farm (record#51, second page). What is even more interesting is daughter, Barbara has re-appeared. (See record #52, page 2.) Here we learn she is widowed, age 48, and is living with Frank, John, and Mary with a daughter, Gwendolyn, age 14. Even more interesting, it is noted that Gwendolyn was born in New York. Barbara’s name is given as Barbara Ervin.

Moving down on the second page of the 1930 census data for the Plenzler family, records #54 through #58, it appears as John Jr. had purchased the farm next door (or perhaps his father had subdivided the farm and sold half to his younger son). John is married in 1930 to a woman named Josephine and there are three children: Mary Anne, Adeline, and Raymond. These children were all born in Minnesota.

I have not found any death records for John; however, I did locate an abstract of Mary’s death. Mary passed away on 18 October 1938 in Middle River, Minnesota at the age of 79.